@BreakDrink Podcast, Episode No. 5: Digital Redlining with @hypervisible

In @BreakDrink episode no. 5, we chatted about LOADS of things related to our assumptions about access, policies, and practices in have higher education, specifically with regards to technology and learning. Last year for 2016 #OLCInnovate, I invited Chris Gilliard to share his work on Digital Redlining for a short “Ignite-like” talk. Why do we assume everyone has access to the Internet? Or a device? Or access to the same digital learning resources? What do we know or care about privacy and our data? Thanks for joining us to podcast on the topic, Chris. We suspect you’ll be back to chat more with us sometime about similar issues… and anime, of course

Here are a few show notes, ideas, and resources shared in @BreakDrink episode no. 5 with Chris:

Information Literacy, Filtering & Access

Online Access & Web Architecture

Do you KNOW what limitations to your search or access to your knowledge is like at your institution? Understanding Google Search Algorithms & SEO

Journal Access & Journal Databases: What are your resources or limitations? What can you not find that is not accessible on Google Scholar?

  1. Scholar Buddy Search – Find a friend at a larger university/college + ask them to search a topic (or borrow a password) to compare search results
  2. #icanhazpdf hashtag – Ask a friend on Twitter to email you the closed or pay-for-play publication
  3. Alternative creative ways to search: Find a romantic partner at a larger institution; academic citizenship acquisition? Or other ways to search for journal articles and here.

Searching Online & Information Literacy

The process of how information is shared needs to be explained. There are issues with walling-off information, the privatization of knowledge, and those who are moving towards a blockchain in higher ed. – explain what this means for limitations to information/knowledge.Do we teach our students to go beyond the first page hits on the Google search page? Do you know How Google Search Works? Much of our civic online literacy skills could be developed in order to hold ed tech & technology companies more accountable

Technologies in higher ed have many inequalities and technology is not neutral. Want to get more political for higher ed & #edtech? I’ll let Audrey Watters take this one: The Politics of Ed Tech Issues in higher ed are real for all of our campus stakeholders — students, staff, and faculty. These issues are around privacy, cyberbullying, trolling data security, and more. We need to be asking more about the technologies to learn what is ethically right and the limitations to these platforms, applications, and digital resources.

For a start, why don’t we learn more about privacy. Perhaps, it’s time we take a “short course” on privacy and what it means to be online, connected now. Check out the Privacy Paradox created by Note To Self. There are 5 podcasts and actions you do to take back your privacy & data. BONUS LISTEN: Privacy, Data Survivalism and a New Tech Ethics

We Need To Ask More About…

  • Do we really care about privacy online? Are we putting thoughts into the spaces and places online we are working with our learners?
  • Pew Research – State of Privacy in America  & Online Privacy & Safety articles
  • Do we know how our learners access educational materials and resources at our colleges/universities?
  • Cell-phone dependent students: the learners’ main access for Internet is their mobile device which is problematic as this is their main way to complete coursework, assignments, projects, etc.. (e.g. Educause 2015 mobile study & Case Study from Australia)
  • Do we think about the digital divide when considering our practices in higher ed for teaching, service & support?
  • Are we thinking about the platforms & apps we’re requiring our learners to use and how these technologies might be “sucking up their data”? We should.

@BreakDrink Books for Recommended Reading:

Here’s how to connect with Chris Gilliard to learn more about his work and this topic:

@BreakDrink Podcasts Shoutouts/Recommendations:

If you have comments, questions, or feedback about this podcast episode, please feel free to post a comment below, or follow us on the following the “BreakDrink” podcast channels:

We welcome banter & comments there. If y’all listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a rating and review.

Today’s #AcAdv Chat Topic: Data Analytics in Academic Advising #highered

A couple of week’s ago, I was fortunate to join the Open SUNY COTE Summit 2017. I will be sure to share more about the #COTEsummit learning in the coming weeks; however, the last session helped me think about framing TODAY’s (3/21) #AcAdv Chat I’ll be moderating from 12-1 pm CT: Data Analytics in #AcAdv 

During the #COTEsummit Learning Analytics panel hosted by OLC, we dug into what information we know and how we use it to understand more about our learners.  Many academic advising units/divisions, often jump to the platform or process for how we analyze students to predict learner behavior:

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But before advising leaders in higher ed jump on the big data bandwagon or decide to implement technology platform to collect data, I think our support units need to identify what information and data we need to know to effectively support our learners. Let’s make decisions on the data that is most helpful, instead of letting predictive analytics make decisions for us at our institutions. What often gets lost in this conversation and planning is this: learning or learning analytics.

Learning analytics are about learning (Gašević, Dawson, & Siemens, 2015). Sometimes we forget this about learning analytics when the phrase data is tossed out at the  “strategic-planning-task-force-retention-student-success-operation” meeting occurs at our universities and colleges. Sure, learning analytics might be most relevant for instructors and faculty; however, learning data is also critical for those who support the instructional design, scaffold student success, and provide academic advising/support in higher education.

Image c/o Giulia Forsythe

In thinking about academic advising and learner support, I have SO many questions about data and data analytics for this #AcAdv Chat topic… here are just a few:

  • How does your institution collect, store, and share data campus-wide?
  • What do you do as a staff or faculty member to interpret the data?
  • Are you able to interpret, read, and translate the information provided about your learners?
  • Are there real-time notifications where students, staff, and faculty can interpret academic progress? What does this look like at your campus?
  • Do your data sets on campus talk to one another? Is there much interaction between your student information system, learning management system, institutional portal, or institutional research data? Why or why not?
  • What challenges and/or issues have you thought about for how data is collected and/or reviewed for learner support?
  • Who or what office can you reach out to on campus for “data analysis” or digging into your learner data to interpret further to support the work you do?

What thoughts or questions do you have about this issue, higher ed? Won’t you join us for today’s #acadv chat conversation? Here’s how:

TWEETS from the #AcAdv Chat conversation on 03.21.17

Reference:

Gašević, D., Dawson, S., & Siemens, G. (2015). Let’s not forget: Learning analytics are about learning. TechTrends, 59(1), 64-71.

The #3Wedu Podcast, No. 14: Gender Matters

As our institutions welcome new faculty and onboard staff members, higher learning organizations often experience either (or both) salary compression and salary inversion. Why raise the salary of tenured professors or administrative staff, if this talent can be replaced by recruiting new professionals or faculty for substantially less? Or just focus on one or two impact hires that bargain a salary much higher than their counterparts already on campus?  In previous #3Wedu podcasts (listen to episode no. 6 and no. 7), we have certainly discussed the glass ceiling for women in the workforce. Although these #3Wedu chats dig into the issues and opportunities for advancement in higher education; we have not even touched what it means for women who want to pursue senior leadership roles at the administrative level?

One of the most measured issues of inconsistency is the salary and pay gap between women and men. In administrative roles at our colleges and universities, women have only moved from $0.77 to $.80 on the dollar between 2001 to 2016, when compared to their male counterparts. But with this fact being shared, there are even more concerns about the gender gap those who hold faculty rank in a department or across a discipline AND the pathways/pipelines women have to administrative leadership in higher ed.

presidents statistics in higher ed
Image c/o Higher Ed Spotlight: Pipelines, Pathways, and Institutional Leadership [REPORT]

To dig into this issue further, I’m looking forward to welcoming  Ann Marie Klotz and Rich Whitney to share a bit around their narrative research inquiry for the impacts gender has in our university settings, specifically with regards to presidential leadership. [To Read: Ann Marie’s doctoral research will give you further insight on this topic as well]. Does gender matter for leadership in higher education? How do women presidents impact university leadership? What is their experience like? We will dig into these findings, specifically with a recent manuscript publication they completed, from their abstract:

“In spite of the increased enrollment numbers for women students, and that the demographic is enrolling and graduating at faster rates than their male counterparts, there are very few women in the highest level of leadership within a university. Several reasons for this phenomena include historical inequalities, stereotypical notions about women’s leadership styles, the presence of a chilly climate on college campuses, and the male-dominated history of academia. All of these impact the speed of advancement and professional options for women. This is a narrative inquiry study is part of a larger study that examines the role of gender and meaning-making for women in leadership within higher education, specifically at the level of the university presidency.

Join us TODAY (2/22) to discuss the impact and influence of gender on campus. Of course, we will always have dedicated time check-in with the #3Wedu ladies, who have been busy leading in research and conference happenings since January.  

@BreakDrink Podcast, Episode No. 2 with @JulissaArce

Today a number of folks stayed at home and/or were on the street for the Day Without Immigrants (#ADayWithoutImmigrants and #DayWithoutImmigrants) movement. A number of businesses were closed today and many immigrants refused to spend money. This event is about coming together to give respect to many people who have helped to build and continue to give back to this country. I stayed home and spent no money to stand with other immigrants in solidarity. From one immigrant to another, this is a day to recognize the contributions many of immigrants provide to the US of A. #Amen

adaywithoutimmigrants

In a recent conversation on @BreakDrink Podcast, Episode no. 2, we spoke with Julissa Acre share her narrative and perspective on recent events in the US. Julissa was a Standout Student, A Star At Goldman Sachs — And Undocumented, who published a book on her story: My (Underground) American Dream. As a former UT student of Jeff’s, Julissa chatted with us about her experience growing up as an undocumented American. In recent events from President Trump’s executive order for an immigration ban, we had to talk about the impact this order could have on a college and university campuses in the US. Podcast no. 2 is jam-packed with information and resources on the topic and should be on your “must listen list.” I found this conversation and creation of the podcast show notes VERY informative. Listen to @BreakDrink Episode No. 2 NOW! [More show notes there!]

undocumented_american_dream

This podcast just shares a part of her story. It’s a great read — I definitely recommend it for you and/or your students. If you currently work in higher ed, Julissa suggested we visit the Educators for Fair Consideration website for resources, scholarships, and more information: http://www.e4fc.org/ 

Here are a few general suggestions for working with undocumented students at your institution:

  • Be kind
  • Help/listen to your students’ issues/challenges
  • Ask further questions for understanding their needs
  • Ensure your Career Center is giving out the correct employment information
  • Identify where your students can ask questions and get further resources/help beyond you on and off campus

Julissa has also included RESOURCES for you to check out on her website. As educators, we need to be in the know and aware about how our institution supports and provides outreach for undocumented and DACA students on campus. And perhaps, Julissa Acre will (or could) be coming to a campus near youThanks so much for chatting with us Julissa — we learned so much from your story, and we hope others benefit from what you have shared in your book as well. Here are a few ways to stay connected to Julissa Acre:

 

To share this podcast with friends, families, or foes, feel free to do so with the following links:

If you have comments, questions, or feedback about this podcast episode OR want to share your own input/resources, please feel free to post a comment below, or follow us on the following “BreakDrink” podcast channels:

Podcasting, You’ve Changed… @BreakDrink Meanderings from Episode No. 1

Once upon a time, there was the original BreakDrink podcast. You might know them from the collaborative efforts of this podcast network from 2010 to 2013. Well… we’re back. Sort of. It’s not a comeback or the same @BreakDrink you know (and love?). This BreakDrink podcast will share the real conversation Jeff and I typically have … and perhaps a perspective from any guest who might be willing to join us for a bit of a chat. I have no doubt we will have random conversations. It could touch upon higher ed issues and possibly a bit of technology — but really, this podcast will dig into other relevant topics like tacos, coffee, travel, parenting, the NBA, rescue dogs, and more.  Why are we podcasting again? Apparently, we need a podcast to talk and record this banter on a regular basis — and, if you subscribe, then you can reap the benefits of these meanderings in our chats. 

breakdrink_logo_color_stackedrss

In our first episode of BreakDrink in January, Jeff and I reflected on how much podcasting has changed (or not changed) with the infusion of quality content productions and shared what’s in the podcasting realm we listen to these days. We both appreciate the storytelling meets investigation journalism, and love the audio format. For others on the podcasting bandwagon, I blame/thank Serial for the resurgence of this medium. 🙂  Since we’ve been out of the podcasting game, there are a few others podcasters who have emerged and this episode is a deep dive into just a few that sit on our podcast playlist that we enjoy. 

Here are a few recommended podcasts that Jeff & I have listened to … as of late:

    • Reply All hosted by PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman (from TDLR)
    • Crimetown
    • Homecoming starring Catherine Keener, Oscar Isaac, and David Schwimmer.
    • Wiretap (archived) by Jonathan Goldstein
    • Heavyweight with Jonathan Goldstein
    • We thank Serial for bringing back podcast love.
    • Startup chronicles the Gimlet Media podcast network startup (season 1)

And a  few, of MANY, higher ed podcasts to add to your listening cue:

You can listen directly below, or check out the notes from BreakDrink, Episode No. 1:

To share this podcast with friends, families, or foes, feel free to do so with the following links:

If you have comments, questions, or feedback about this podcast episode OR want to share your own input/resources, please feel free to post a comment below, or follow us on the following “BreakDrink” podcast channels:

Wine Forward with #3Wedu

This past weekend brought a number of women from around the world together for the Women’s March on Washington. I was inspired by local movements, shared messages, and photos curated from this global event. That being said, I hope that this is just the start of how we move forward in 2017. In the world of work, we know there is still much to do, such as, narrow the gender pay gap, place women into leadership/CEO positions in our organization, and change the perspective/reality of men who are disinterested in “jobs typically done by women.”
logo_wine-forward_complete-color

Image c/o WineForward distributors. 

In order to “wine forward,” we should look in both directions. On the past #3Wedu episode, We reflected on 2016 and discussed our goals for a healthy 2017. Now it’s time to take action and wine/move forward with purpose!

51718-fast-forward-circular-button

Fast forward button by Thomas Harmel

In the upcoming #3Wedu episode this Wednesday (1/25) at 3 pm PT/5 pm CT/6 pm ET we will discuss our experiences from the Women’s’ March on Washington, we’ll share some readings/books we’ve enjoyed over the past month, and we’ll talk about how we plan on moving forward from the ick factor of 2016 — specifically as we strive with purpose and power towards  our academic, professional, and personal goals.

Join us Wednesday, January 25th for wine, banter, and more here:

This blog post is cross-posted on The #3Wedu Podcast Blog. Read more there!

Social Scholarship: Being a Digital Academic #AcDigID

In thinking about scholarship today, I can certainly see how the web has influenced and impacted an academic’s professional life. Greenhow and Gleason (2014) outline the impacts of social scholarship using Boyer’s (1990) four dimensions of scholarship: discovery, integration, teaching, and application. In the social media age of academics, there are a couple of key questions that still need to be examined (Greenhow & Gleason, 2014, p. 1):

  • What is scholarship reconsidered in the age of social media?

  • How ought we to conceptualize social scholarship —a new set of practices being discussed in various disciplines?

Whether faculty are reluctant or embrace social media in their work life, it is apparent our institutions are not directing these online initiatives. Both policies and programs to support graduate students, researchers, and scholars have not met the needs of this growing social scholarship integration (Greenhow & Gleason, 2014). Social and digital spaces are thriving in academia. Academic social networks are on the rise and there are a number of reasons why scholars use social media and digital resources (Van Noorden, 2014). In thinking about how scholars interact and participate on social media, there are increasing considerations and questions faculty have about engaging/being online. Although I wish there was an “app for that” as an easy solution for an academic (see below), I think it takes some thought and intentionality for identifying and developing social/digital scholarship.

phd113016s

Image: Handy Academic Apps by PhD Comics

In the upcoming, Developing Your Social Media and Digital Presence for Faculty, Researchers, and Scholars (#AcDigID) online workshop, I hope to dig into digital identity development, discuss open and shared practices on social media, and share challenges and affordance being a networked academic. Whether you are a faculty who teaches online, face-to-face, or in blended learning environments, an early career scholar, or seasoned researcher — this workshop might be for you if you are interested in crafting your digital identity and interested in being part of a networked community of academics online. [Note: Future iterations of this OLC online workshop in 2017 will be targeted towards practitioners and administrators in higher education.]

OVERVIEW OF THE WORKSHOP: What does your online identity look like today? Have you Googled yourself lately? In academia, it is becoming increasingly vital to publish and share your teaching, service, and research scholarship. Besides developing an online presence and utilizing social media for professional development, faculty, researchers, and early career scholars are actively utilizing open and digital channels to enhance their instruction, share research findings, and find support in a community of connected scholars. Scholars are using online networks to share syllabi, ask questions for research needs, solicit support for peer review, and be part of the sharing economy for research impacts. In this workshop, we will explore meaningful ways to craft an active, online persona that includes using social media and other digital resources for teaching, service, and research in academia.

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate social media and digital platforms for faculty development, connected scholarship, and to enhance research impact.
  • Establish effective strategies for developing an online digital identity within the open, networked community online.
  • Outline the benefits and challenges of open and digital scholarship, specifically with regards to social media and other networked platforms.

This is an asynchronous, week-long online workshop which will begin on a Monday (1/23) and end on the following Sunday (1/29).  If you want a look at the #AcDigID workshop agenda, here is the outline for short-course:

  • Why Does Social & Digital Identity Matter in Academia?
    • Getting started, digital identity development, and state of scholars online
  • The Tools of the Digital Academic Trade: Social Media
    • Twitter, hashtags, blogging, podcasting, LinkedIn, and more!
  • Being a Connected and Digital Scholar
    • Digital research impact and influence: ORCID iD, Academia.edu, ResearchGate, etc.
  • Openness in Academia: Benefits & Challenges
    • Working “in the open”  and the tension between benefits & challenges of online
  • Building Your Social and Digital Presence Online
    • Creating your own space and place for scholarship
  • Developing Your Digital Academic Identity
    • Bonus: Ways to aggregate and showcase your digital academic self

Dates Offered: January 23-29, 2017; Registration Page (to sign up)

To prepare for the workshop ahead, I am adding articles, resources, and suggestions. If you are an academic who is/was on social media, academic networking sites, or just online – please consider sharing your #AcDigID ADVICE and KNOWLEGE below:

  • ADD TO THE TWITTER LIST: Are you on the“Academics Who Tweet” Twitter list? I would like to get a variety of scholars from all disciplines and areas in higher education. Let me know if YOU or someone else should be added.
  • USE the #AcDigID Workshop HASHTAG this week to introduce yourself, say hello, share resources, or offer advice. I am encouraging learners to follow, read, and use this same hashtag during the week of January 23-29, 2017.
  • TELL YOUR #AcDigID STORY: Interested in coming to talk about your #AcDigID development? How did you become a networked academic? Why do you participate in networked, online communities higher ed? Let me know – happy to have you join during our #AcDigID Online, Synchronous Meeting on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 from 12-1 pm CST. [Drop me a DM on Twitter: @laurapasquini]
  • PARTICIPATE & TWEET during the #AcDigID Twitter Chat: Join us for the LIVE Twitter chat on Saturday, January 28, 2017  from 10-11 am CST.  Using the workshop hashtag, #AcDigID, I will moderate a Q&A 60-minute chat digging into the questions, challenges, and ideas/suggestions for being a networked scholar.

I look forward to seeing some of you in the OLC workshop, and others joining the #AcDigID online meeting (1/25), Twitter Chat (1/28) and contributing to the conversation using the #AcDigID workshop hashtag soon!

References:

Greenhow, C., & Gleason, B. (2014). Social scholarship: Reconsidering scholarly practices in the age of social media. British Journal of Educational Technology, 45(3), 392-402.

Van Noorden, R. (2014). Online collaboration: Scientists and the social network. Nature, 512(7513), 126-129.