#AcWri, BreakDrink, Higher Education, Research, StudentAffairs

Publication Lessons Learned as an Early Career Scholar [@BreakDrink Episode no. 11]

As a follow-up to @BreakDrink Episode no. 9 and no. 8, Jeff and I continue to discuss the lessons we have learned in our early days of scholarship. HINT: We are still (and always) learning about the #acwri process. You can listen to some of our publishing ponderings on @BreakDrink episode no. 11: So You Want To Publish? On Academic Writing [Full Show Notes] and listen via SoundCloud here:

Much of what we’re discussing, is really just us processing ideas for a potential conference session and/or toolkit to get other higher education professionals involved in scholarly work. That is, front-line practitioners who directly work with and support learners. Typically these are professional staff who are involved in practice and rarely jump into the realm of scholarly writing and academic publishing — where we NEED to showcase and share evidence-based practices from the field. In talking and working with various scholar-practitioners, I have learned so much about how graduate prep programs vary in student affairs/services and/or higher education programs. Many of these applied education experiences are leaving higher education practitioners with minimal academic research knowledge and limited scholarly writing opportunities. In turn, the programs and practices implemented in post-secondary education, often leave out a research design, data analysis, and production towards an academic manuscript.

It is a critical time in post-secondary education where we MUST SHOW EVIDENCE and we SHOULD be contributing to the canon of student support services and student affairs scholarship. Higher ed professionals should be contributing to the empirical trail of our applied work beyond traditional teaching and learning — so it’s time #ShutUpAndWrite to PUBLISH!

We are just scratching the surface in this podcasts, as we being to think about developmental support for engaging practitioners and professionals in higher ed with the #AcWri process.  After listening to the out-loud ponderings on this podcast, here are a few lessons learned from our own early career research experiences with academic writing/publishing:

  • Create products for publication. Always. We need to have graduate students, master’s and doctoral-level, to think about crafting their academic writing for a publication and not just a paper or assignment. Consider WHERE and HOW you would use each writing piece for publications. You should not just have artifacts from courses submitted for a grade. Consider how you will use each piece of your coursework or research for a potential academic publication as well.
  • Get experience with peer-review: Practice of reviewing for peer-review and/or editing to be part of the academic publication process. Academic writing and publishing is a PROCESS. Each paper submitted goes through a particular workflow and are (most often) managed by volunteers and scholars who will review your work. Reviewing manuscripts, copy-editing, and evening managing a journal takes TIME – but it does help you learn what to expect for the stages of submitting an article. If you have not completed any peer review for an academic journal, you should! Learning about the expectations and experiences from the backend of a journal will give you more insights to where manuscripts go when submitted for publication.
  • Share the writing, peer review, and publishing process: The process of comments from editors, rejections from journals, and response to publications needs to be talked about among scholars & practitioners. Let’s normalize the process and share the experience.
  • Search for your manuscript FIT! Scopus is the mega database of abstracts and citations of peer-reviewed literature: scientific journals, books, and conference proceedings. Search and download “Scopus List” a spreadsheet for specific details for each journal. Where could your paper fit in? Could you take another lens or approach to fit the journal scope? Assess the fit of this BEFORE you submit!
  • Avoid desk rejects: This is when an editor rejects your manuscript and (hopefully) offers you feedback on the scope and/or fit for your paper within a few days of the week of submission. This avoids your manuscript sitting through the lengthy peer-review process for no reason. Why not reach out to the editor in advance with your paper abstract to inquire more about the fit/scope and if your manuscript is appropriate for submission first? This is also a great way to learn about what the peer-reviewers will be identifying and develop your professional connections.
  • Not all papers need to be in prestigious journals: Consider submitting to B-level journals and having a few targets for your paper that might fit if it is rejected – so you can take feedback to update and/or turn around to submit somewhere else. There is NO shortage of academic outlets for publications. Consider asking academic mentors or scholars in your specific area of expertise/discipline what other suitable journals might be a good target. Have a few journal outlets in mind to resubmit if rejected.
  • Love Your Librarian: Ask your librarians for support with your research on topics, to journal outlets, databases to search for empirical literature,  and/or where/how to archive your own publications (or say set up your own journal). Academic librarians have an understanding of where to look for publishing outlets with suggestions of database searches and recommendations for various disciplines of study.
  • Support and consider how you involve practitioners in scholarship — AND vice versa! Here are a few thoughts I shared about working with scholar-practitioners. Mentioned on @BreakdRink episode no. 8 and blogged by Laura. OR if you are a practitioner in education reach out to an academic to share about your potential sample population, research design, or general idea of study you want to be involved with for further inquiry.

If you have some resources and ideas on the topic of academic publishing — let us know! We would love for you to post a comment below, or connect with us via any of the “BreakDrink” podcast channels:

We welcome feedback, comments, suggestions, and/or sass in any of the above digital spaces. If the podcast via iTunes (Apple Podcasts), please consider leaving us a rating and review. Cheers!

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BreakDrink, EdTech, Higher Education, Podcast

@BreakDrink Podcast, Episode No. 5: Digital Redlining with @hypervisible

In @BreakDrink episode no. 5, we chatted about LOADS of things related to our assumptions about access, policies, and practices in have higher education, specifically with regards to technology and learning. Last year for 2016 #OLCInnovate, I invited Chris Gilliard to share his work on Digital Redlining for a short “Ignite-like” talk. Why do we assume everyone has access to the Internet? Or a device? Or access to the same digital learning resources? What do we know or care about privacy and our data? Thanks for joining us to podcast on the topic, Chris. We suspect you’ll be back to chat more with us sometime about similar issues… and anime, of course

Here are a few show notes, ideas, and resources shared in @BreakDrink episode no. 5 with Chris:

Information Literacy, Filtering & Access

Online Access & Web Architecture

Do you KNOW what limitations to your search or access to your knowledge is like at your institution? Understanding Google Search Algorithms & SEO

Journal Access & Journal Databases: What are your resources or limitations? What can you not find that is not accessible on Google Scholar?

  1. Scholar Buddy Search – Find a friend at a larger university/college + ask them to search a topic (or borrow a password) to compare search results
  2. #icanhazpdf hashtag – Ask a friend on Twitter to email you the closed or pay-for-play publication
  3. Alternative creative ways to search: Find a romantic partner at a larger institution; academic citizenship acquisition? Or other ways to search for journal articles and here.

Searching Online & Information Literacy

The process of how information is shared needs to be explained. There are issues with walling-off information, the privatization of knowledge, and those who are moving towards a blockchain in higher ed. – explain what this means for limitations to information/knowledge.Do we teach our students to go beyond the first page hits on the Google search page? Do you know How Google Search Works? Much of our civic online literacy skills could be developed in order to hold ed tech & technology companies more accountable

Technologies in higher ed have many inequalities and technology is not neutral. Want to get more political for higher ed & #edtech? I’ll let Audrey Watters take this one: The Politics of Ed Tech Issues in higher ed are real for all of our campus stakeholders — students, staff, and faculty. These issues are around privacy, cyberbullying, trolling data security, and more. We need to be asking more about the technologies to learn what is ethically right and the limitations to these platforms, applications, and digital resources.

For a start, why don’t we learn more about privacy. Perhaps, it’s time we take a “short course” on privacy and what it means to be online, connected now. Check out the Privacy Paradox created by Note To Self. There are 5 podcasts and actions you do to take back your privacy & data. BONUS LISTEN: Privacy, Data Survivalism and a New Tech Ethics

We Need To Ask More About…

  • Do we really care about privacy online? Are we putting thoughts into the spaces and places online we are working with our learners?
  • Pew Research – State of Privacy in America  & Online Privacy & Safety articles
  • Do we know how our learners access educational materials and resources at our colleges/universities?
  • Cell-phone dependent students: the learners’ main access for Internet is their mobile device which is problematic as this is their main way to complete coursework, assignments, projects, etc.. (e.g. Educause 2015 mobile study & Case Study from Australia)
  • Do we think about the digital divide when considering our practices in higher ed for teaching, service & support?
  • Are we thinking about the platforms & apps we’re requiring our learners to use and how these technologies might be “sucking up their data”? We should.

@BreakDrink Books for Recommended Reading:

Here’s how to connect with Chris Gilliard to learn more about his work and this topic:

@BreakDrink Podcasts Shoutouts/Recommendations:

If you have comments, questions, or feedback about this podcast episode, please feel free to post a comment below, or follow us on the following the “BreakDrink” podcast channels:

We welcome banter & comments there. If y’all listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a rating and review.

BreakDrink, Podcast

#TBT with Ol’ Skool @BreakDrink Friends on Episode No. 3

You may (or may not) recall a certain network of podcasts created by @BreakDrink between 2010-2013 where I  co-hosted, with Jeff, Jeff, and/or Bruce, on the Campus Tech Connection (#CTCX) podcast. This was ONE of many podcasts in the @BreakDrink network. There was so many great news, stories, and learning shared on the On Duty, CUAD, EDU Sports, and the Daily Dose.  Although @BreakDrink has returned to podcasting a single show with a slightly different slant, we thought we’d do a series of “where are they now” or #TBT episodes with the BreakDrink Family (former hosts of ALL.THE.PODCASTS). Side note: I do think that Jeff Jackson IS the Alex Blumberg of podcasting in higher ed. He developed his own podcasting network before its time and/or rise in popularity for produced shows. 🙂

The @BreakDrink Retro Logo
The @BreakDrink Retro Logo

A couple of weeks ago, Jeff and I chatted with our good friends and former podcasters of the “main”@BreakDrink Student Affairs podcast: Julie Larsen & Gary Ballinger. It was a delight to catch up with both Gary and Julie on episode no. 3, as we reminisced BD podcasting days, gave updates on life & time (See: Gary’s “scholarly & shit” comment), and swapped updates of what has happened off the air.  FUN FACT: I thank Jeff Jackson for introducing me to my BFF, Julie, through the @BreakDrink network. BONUS: check out our show notes on the BreakDrink website to learn where and how @BreakDrink got its name!

We hope to welcome other @BreakDrink family members to the podcast in the future for a chat, some banter, and more. I have no doubt that many of you are up to some good out there — I’m looking forward to catching up!

@BreakDrink Logo
@BreakDrink Logo

If you have comments, questions, or feedback about this podcast episode OR want to share your own input resources, please feel free to post a comment below, or follow us on the following “BreakDrink” podcast channels:

We welcome banter & comments there. If y’all listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a rating and review.

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@BreakDrink Podcast, Episode No. 2 with @JulissaArce

Today a number of folks stayed at home and/or were on the street for the Day Without Immigrants (#ADayWithoutImmigrants and #DayWithoutImmigrants) movement. A number of businesses were closed today and many immigrants refused to spend money. This event is about coming together to give respect to many people who have helped to build and continue to give back to this country. I stayed home and spent no money to stand with other immigrants in solidarity. From one immigrant to another, this is a day to recognize the contributions many of immigrants provide to the US of A. #Amen

adaywithoutimmigrants

In a recent conversation on @BreakDrink Podcast, Episode no. 2, we spoke with Julissa Acre share her narrative and perspective on recent events in the US. Julissa was a Standout Student, A Star At Goldman Sachs — And Undocumented, who published a book on her story: My (Underground) American Dream. As a former UT student of Jeff’s, Julissa chatted with us about her experience growing up as an undocumented American. In recent events from President Trump’s executive order for an immigration ban, we had to talk about the impact this order could have on a college and university campuses in the US. Podcast no. 2 is jam-packed with information and resources on the topic and should be on your “must listen list.” I found this conversation and creation of the podcast show notes VERY informative. Listen to @BreakDrink Episode No. 2 NOW! [More show notes there!]

undocumented_american_dream

This podcast just shares a part of her story. It’s a great read — I definitely recommend it for you and/or your students. If you currently work in higher ed, Julissa suggested we visit the Educators for Fair Consideration website for resources, scholarships, and more information: http://www.e4fc.org/ 

Here are a few general suggestions for working with undocumented students at your institution:

  • Be kind
  • Help/listen to your students’ issues/challenges
  • Ask further questions for understanding their needs
  • Ensure your Career Center is giving out the correct employment information
  • Identify where your students can ask questions and get further resources/help beyond you on and off campus

Julissa has also included RESOURCES for you to check out on her website. As educators, we need to be in the know and aware about how our institution supports and provides outreach for undocumented and DACA students on campus. And perhaps, Julissa Acre will (or could) be coming to a campus near youThanks so much for chatting with us Julissa — we learned so much from your story, and we hope others benefit from what you have shared in your book as well. Here are a few ways to stay connected to Julissa Acre:

 

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