AcAdv, AdvTech, Higher Education

Today’s #AcAdv Chat Topic: Data Analytics in Academic Advising #highered

A couple of week’s ago, I was fortunate to join the Open SUNY COTE Summit 2017. I will be sure to share more about the #COTEsummit learning in the coming weeks; however, the last session helped me think about framing TODAY’s (3/21) #AcAdv Chat I’ll be moderating from 12-1 pm CT: Data Analytics in #AcAdv 

During the #COTEsummit Learning Analytics panel hosted by OLC, we dug into what information we know and how we use it to understand more about our learners.  Many academic advising units/divisions, often jump to the platform or process for how we analyze students to predict learner behavior:

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But before advising leaders in higher ed jump on the big data bandwagon or decide to implement technology platform to collect data, I think our support units need to identify what information and data we need to know to effectively support our learners. Let’s make decisions on the data that is most helpful, instead of letting predictive analytics make decisions for us at our institutions. What often gets lost in this conversation and planning is this: learning or learning analytics.

Learning analytics are about learning (Gašević, Dawson, & Siemens, 2015). Sometimes we forget this about learning analytics when the phrase data is tossed out at the  “strategic-planning-task-force-retention-student-success-operation” meeting occurs at our universities and colleges. Sure, learning analytics might be most relevant for instructors and faculty; however, learning data is also critical for those who support the instructional design, scaffold student success, and provide academic advising/support in higher education.

Image c/o Giulia Forsythe

In thinking about academic advising and learner support, I have SO many questions about data and data analytics for this #AcAdv Chat topic… here are just a few:

  • How does your institution collect, store, and share data campus-wide?
  • What do you do as a staff or faculty member to interpret the data?
  • Are you able to interpret, read, and translate the information provided about your learners?
  • Are there real-time notifications where students, staff, and faculty can interpret academic progress? What does this look like at your campus?
  • Do your data sets on campus talk to one another? Is there much interaction between your student information system, learning management system, institutional portal, or institutional research data? Why or why not?
  • What challenges and/or issues have you thought about for how data is collected and/or reviewed for learner support?
  • Who or what office can you reach out to on campus for “data analysis” or digging into your learner data to interpret further to support the work you do?

What thoughts or questions do you have about this issue, higher ed? Won’t you join us for today’s #acadv chat conversation? Here’s how:

TWEETS from the #AcAdv Chat conversation on 03.21.17

Reference:

Gašević, D., Dawson, S., & Siemens, G. (2015). Let’s not forget: Learning analytics are about learning. TechTrends, 59(1), 64-71.

Higher Education, Networked Community, Podcast, Professional Development, Research, StudentAffairs, Training & Development

Where’s Your Digital “Water Cooler” for Professional Development?

Social media has afforded a number of educators (both in higher ed and K-12) a space and place to share, learn, curate, and connect.  If you look online, you will find no shortage of educational hashtags, podcasts, blogs, Twitter chats, online groups, and more. These user-driven, digital communities are thriving as teachers, faculty, staff, and students seek out professional development virtually. It makes sense as social media PD is on-demand, socially integrated, accessible from a variety of devices, portable, and FREE!

Image c/o Killer Infographics (https://vimeo.com/89969554)
Image c/o Killer Infographics https://vimeo.com/89969554

Last week, I shared how our networked communities are a bit like a digital water cool for PD on Vicki Davis’ (@coolcatteacher) 10-Minute Teacher Podcast, episode no. 19: Social Media PD Best Practices #DLDay (or Listen on iTunes). Check out the wealth of resources from Vicki, that definitely spills past K-12 education sphere:

cropped-the-cool-cat-teacher-blog

In looking at these social media spaces, both for research and practice, I am grateful for the learning, support, and care I have received from my peers. I share about the #AcAdv Chat community on this podcast and how it has impacted my practices, with regards to how I support learners in academic advising and instruction. Not only has it been a form of PD, but I am thankful for the connections I have made on a personal level.  I have a number of #AcAdv colleagues have become close friends, and I value them well beyond being a Twitter follower or Facebook reaction in my feed.

These social technologies are connecting professional to help us in the workplace. They allow us to be more fluid to allow for us to search for ideas, share effective practices, offer just-in-time training, and broadcast our daily work experiences online.

to-be-in-a-profession-being-social-is-really-important-and-vital-for-our-practices-to-advance-and-you-dont-do-that-without-learning-from-one-another

These social media “water coolers” are having an impact on how we work in higher ed. It’s not the medium, per se, but we should examine how these platforms impact our social interactions and community development in the field. I believe social media affords us great opportunities for how we share information, curate knowledge, support professional learning, and apply ideas into our practice. That being said, there are challenges and issues we must also consider with regards to professional identity development, being in a networked space to learn, and how these mediums might influence our practice. As we talk with higher ed administrators and staff for our research study, we are beginning to chip away at the motivations for being part of a digital community, how practitioners value online spaces to support the work in highered, what does it mean to be a “public” professional online, and how personal/professional identity is complicated, evolving, and varies based on social media platform or how a community is support.  This research is SO fascinating…

We will share more about our findings soon. That being said, we are still collecting data AND interested in hearing about YOUR networked experience. Where is your digital water cooler on social media? Where do you go online to learn, share, and curate knowledge? How does being online and in these virtual spaces impact your professional (and personal) identity, growth, and career?

SURVEY: http://bit.ly/networkedcommunity

Here s a short, web-based survey that will take 15-20 minutes to complete. You will be asked questions about your online/digital communities of practice, and you will be given the option to share about your digital, online engagement.

INTERVIEW: http://bit.ly/networkedcommunityshare

We are interested in understanding more of your digital, networked self, which might include reviewing your digital presence on social media and other online platforms, and you may potentially be invited for one (1) interview lasting approximately 45-60 minutes in duration. During our interviews, we will ask participants to reflect on networked practices in online digital communities, inquire about your observations of these communities, ask about your interactions and contributions in the network, and discuss issues related to professional identity and professional influence in online spaces.

BreakDrink, Podcast

#TBT with Ol’ Skool @BreakDrink Friends on Episode No. 3

You may (or may not) recall a certain network of podcasts created by @BreakDrink between 2010-2013 where I  co-hosted, with Jeff, Jeff, and/or Bruce, on the Campus Tech Connection (#CTCX) podcast. This was ONE of many podcasts in the @BreakDrink network. There was so many great news, stories, and learning shared on the On Duty, CUAD, EDU Sports, and the Daily Dose.  Although @BreakDrink has returned to podcasting a single show with a slightly different slant, we thought we’d do a series of “where are they now” or #TBT episodes with the BreakDrink Family (former hosts of ALL.THE.PODCASTS). Side note: I do think that Jeff Jackson IS the Alex Blumberg of podcasting in higher ed. He developed his own podcasting network before its time and/or rise in popularity for produced shows. 🙂

The @BreakDrink Retro Logo
The @BreakDrink Retro Logo

A couple of weeks ago, Jeff and I chatted with our good friends and former podcasters of the “main”@BreakDrink Student Affairs podcast: Julie Larsen & Gary Ballinger. It was a delight to catch up with both Gary and Julie on episode no. 3, as we reminisced BD podcasting days, gave updates on life & time (See: Gary’s “scholarly & shit” comment), and swapped updates of what has happened off the air.  FUN FACT: I thank Jeff Jackson for introducing me to my BFF, Julie, through the @BreakDrink network. BONUS: check out our show notes on the BreakDrink website to learn where and how @BreakDrink got its name!

We hope to welcome other @BreakDrink family members to the podcast in the future for a chat, some banter, and more. I have no doubt that many of you are up to some good out there — I’m looking forward to catching up!

@BreakDrink Logo
@BreakDrink Logo

If you have comments, questions, or feedback about this podcast episode OR want to share your own input resources, please feel free to post a comment below, or follow us on the following “BreakDrink” podcast channels:

We welcome banter & comments there. If y’all listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a rating and review.

#3Wedu, Higher Education, Podcast, women, WomenWhoWine.edu

The #3Wedu Podcast, No. 14: Gender Matters

As our institutions welcome new faculty and onboard staff members, higher learning organizations often experience either (or both) salary compression and salary inversion. Why raise the salary of tenured professors or administrative staff, if this talent can be replaced by recruiting new professionals or faculty for substantially less? Or just focus on one or two impact hires that bargain a salary much higher than their counterparts already on campus?  In previous #3Wedu podcasts (listen to episode no. 6 and no. 7), we have certainly discussed the glass ceiling for women in the workforce. Although these #3Wedu chats dig into the issues and opportunities for advancement in higher education; we have not even touched what it means for women who want to pursue senior leadership roles at the administrative level?

One of the most measured issues of inconsistency is the salary and pay gap between women and men. In administrative roles at our colleges and universities, women have only moved from $0.77 to $.80 on the dollar between 2001 to 2016, when compared to their male counterparts. But with this fact being shared, there are even more concerns about the gender gap those who hold faculty rank in a department or across a discipline AND the pathways/pipelines women have to administrative leadership in higher ed.

presidents statistics in higher ed
Image c/o Higher Ed Spotlight: Pipelines, Pathways, and Institutional Leadership [REPORT]

To dig into this issue further, I’m looking forward to welcoming  Ann Marie Klotz and Rich Whitney to share a bit around their narrative research inquiry for the impacts gender has in our university settings, specifically with regards to presidential leadership. [To Read: Ann Marie’s doctoral research will give you further insight on this topic as well]. Does gender matter for leadership in higher education? How do women presidents impact university leadership? What is their experience like? We will dig into these findings, specifically with a recent manuscript publication they completed, from their abstract:

“In spite of the increased enrollment numbers for women students, and that the demographic is enrolling and graduating at faster rates than their male counterparts, there are very few women in the highest level of leadership within a university. Several reasons for this phenomena include historical inequalities, stereotypical notions about women’s leadership styles, the presence of a chilly climate on college campuses, and the male-dominated history of academia. All of these impact the speed of advancement and professional options for women. This is a narrative inquiry study is part of a larger study that examines the role of gender and meaning-making for women in leadership within higher education, specifically at the level of the university presidency.

Join us TODAY (2/22) to discuss the impact and influence of gender on campus. Of course, we will always have dedicated time check-in with the #3Wedu ladies, who have been busy leading in research and conference happenings since January.  

BreakDrink, Podcast

@BreakDrink Podcast, Episode No. 2 with @JulissaArce

Today a number of folks stayed at home and/or were on the street for the Day Without Immigrants (#ADayWithoutImmigrants and #DayWithoutImmigrants) movement. A number of businesses were closed today and many immigrants refused to spend money. This event is about coming together to give respect to many people who have helped to build and continue to give back to this country. I stayed home and spent no money to stand with other immigrants in solidarity. From one immigrant to another, this is a day to recognize the contributions many of immigrants provide to the US of A. #Amen

adaywithoutimmigrants

In a recent conversation on @BreakDrink Podcast, Episode no. 2, we spoke with Julissa Acre share her narrative and perspective on recent events in the US. Julissa was a Standout Student, A Star At Goldman Sachs — And Undocumented, who published a book on her story: My (Underground) American Dream. As a former UT student of Jeff’s, Julissa chatted with us about her experience growing up as an undocumented American. In recent events from President Trump’s executive order for an immigration ban, we had to talk about the impact this order could have on a college and university campuses in the US. Podcast no. 2 is jam-packed with information and resources on the topic and should be on your “must listen list.” I found this conversation and creation of the podcast show notes VERY informative. Listen to @BreakDrink Episode No. 2 NOW! [More show notes there!]

undocumented_american_dream

This podcast just shares a part of her story. It’s a great read — I definitely recommend it for you and/or your students. If you currently work in higher ed, Julissa suggested we visit the Educators for Fair Consideration website for resources, scholarships, and more information: http://www.e4fc.org/ 

Here are a few general suggestions for working with undocumented students at your institution:

  • Be kind
  • Help/listen to your students’ issues/challenges
  • Ask further questions for understanding their needs
  • Ensure your Career Center is giving out the correct employment information
  • Identify where your students can ask questions and get further resources/help beyond you on and off campus

Julissa has also included RESOURCES for you to check out on her website. As educators, we need to be in the know and aware about how our institution supports and provides outreach for undocumented and DACA students on campus. And perhaps, Julissa Acre will (or could) be coming to a campus near youThanks so much for chatting with us Julissa — we learned so much from your story, and we hope others benefit from what you have shared in your book as well. Here are a few ways to stay connected to Julissa Acre:

 

To share this podcast with friends, families, or foes, feel free to do so with the following links:

If you have comments, questions, or feedback about this podcast episode OR want to share your own input/resources, please feel free to post a comment below, or follow us on the following “BreakDrink” podcast channels:

Networked Community, Professional Development, Research, video, Virtual Communities

What Communities and Hashtags Connect You On Twitter?

Twitter is commonly used for learning & development. We know that hashtags are great ways to link conversations, trends, news, and happenings on this social network. In real time, you can follow a story, participate in a conversation, and contribute to a community by including a hashtag in your tweet. A hashtag community might be formed by an instructor for a specific educational course or program. Or maybe there is a hashtag you are following for a professional learning event or for a specific conference backchannel (I’ve been known to inquire about these before). Hashtags have the power to share learning/knowledge from a conference for participants who are on-site or at a distance.

GotHashtagFor example, Kimmons and Veletsianos (2016) examined the tweets shared during the 2014 and 2015 American Educational Research Associations (AERA) annual conferences by reviewing the #aera14 and #aera15 hashtag. They found that backchannels are a venue for both scholarly and non-scholarly communications. It’s used for more than just promotion — the conference backchannel offers a way to share work, engage in scholarly conversations, and discussion current events or issues relevant to education.  Want to learn more? Watch the Research Shorts video below:


Conference participants gave a nod to other educational communities online, such as #edchat or #edreform, who regularly dialog, share, and interact with one another on Twitter using their group hashtag.

Like a number of educators, I have an affinity to a few Twitter communities online based on the hashtags they share and use. Some of these groups have regular  Twitter chats, and a number of Twitter communities offer support, advice, and guidance within a field or discipline. I’ll give a hat-tip to (one of many) a hashtag that supported my own work as a doctoral researcher active on Twitter => #PhDchat. This informal, online network has been known to support many graduate students work through dissertation/thesis development, swap research methods, and learn about effective academic writing practices (to name a few). emergent, online community is an informal network. Learn more about the #phdchat community from Ford,  Veletsianos, and Resta’s (2014) as they share their examination of this emerging, online network:

As some of you might know, I am working with some stellar researchers to learn more about how these online, informal Twitter communities/hashtags impact professional development.  We are currently gathering hashtags that you connect to for conversation and community on Twitter. If you participate in a regular/semi-regular Twitter chat with other educations — tell us about it! Or is there just a hashtag you follow and use frequently in your tweets? Let us know! Share your hashtags & Twitter chats you have in your discipline, field, or occupation by ADDING  to this OPEN Google doc — SHARE your Twitter Community and/or Hashtag here: http://bit.ly/hashtagcommunity Thank you!

References:

Ford, K., Veletsianos, G., & Resta, P. (2014). The structure and characteristics of #phdchat, an emergent online social network. Journal of Interactive Media in Education, 18(1).

Kimmons, R. & Veletsianos, G. (2016). Education Scholars’ Evolving Uses of Twitter as a Conference Backchannel and Social Commentary Platform. British Journal of Educational Technology, 47(3), 445—464.

Want to see more visual research? I suggest you go take a look at Research Shorts on YouTube => Subscribe & Watch NOW: http://bit.ly/researchshorts