Learn to Share(ski)

In the spirit of Valentine’s Day, I thought I would post a little bit of technology love and sharing. Last Fall, Dean Shareski joined Alec Couros#eci831 class to discuss The Power of Sharing.

Photo by excomedia

 

Online movement on the internet is very personal and quite social.  When you share ideas and resources it is possible to initiate new connections and develop your online personal learning environment (PLE). Much of this online, social learning creates collaborations, connections and interactions to enhance an education experience.

 

As web 2.0 and social media continues to develop and thrive online, this leaves users with little reason not to share. Most applications are collaborative and creative in nature, which require users to become active participants in the conversation.

Benefits of online sharing & shared learning:

  • immersion into all things ‘like that’
  • interactive web experience
  • publish first and then filter work
  • online & immediate feedback
  • share knowledge & resources easy
  • connection is another means to learning
  • efficient research
  • modelling from others online
  • development collaboration skills
  • variations on an article, concept or idea
  • pay it forward – share what you know and what you do
  • power of connecting people
  • moving toward search & learn
  • networks CAN replace Google
  • encourages filtering information

More stories of shared online learning:

Just a few tools of the sharing trade:

  • Skype
  • Delicious – great resource sharing & connecting
  • Google Reader – RSS feed for bookmarks & paste into add subscriptions for google reader
  • Google Documents
  • Flickr – creative commons license to share; take an idea of how to compose and generate ideas and learn form them
  • Twitter – just in time & just for me learning; personal and professional mix
  • Wikis
  • YouTube
  • SlideShare

What else are you using to share with your personal learning network? Please share.

“Sharing, and sharing online specifically, is not in additions to the work of being an educator. It is the work.”  Ewan McIntosh

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