#AcDigID Workshop: Developing Your Social & Digital Self

Next week I will be facilitating another edition of the @OLCToday workshop on “Developing Your Social Media and Digital Presenceor the #AcDigID workshop (for hashtag & nickname). This 7-day, asynchronous, online workshop is designed to support digital identity development for faculty and staff in higher education.worditout-word-cloud-1870260

Developing Your Social Media and Digital Presence

Workshop Description: What does your online identity look like today? Have you Googled yourself lately? In academia, it is becoming increasingly vital to publish and share your teaching, service, and research knowledge. Besides developing an online presence and utilizing social media for professional development, faculty and staff are actively utilizing open and digital channels to support, learn, and contribute a thriving network of connected scholars. In this workshop, you will explore meaningful ways to craft an active, online persona, learn about strategies to effectively include social media and digital resources for your professional development, and understand how an online community of practice can enhance the work you do.

Learning Objectives:

  • Evaluate social media and digital platforms for faculty professional development, connected learning, and research impact.
  • Establish effective strategies for developing an online digital identity for open, networked scholarship.
  • Outline the benefits & challenges of open and digital scholarship while using social

Dates Offered: September 26-October 2, 2016; Registration Page (to sign up)

 

Here’s the outline for the #AcDigID workshop this coming week:

  • Why Does Social & Digital Identity Matter in Academia?
    • Getting started, digital identity development, and state of scholars online
  • The Tools of the Digital Academic Trade: Social Media
    • Twitter, hashtags, blogging, podcasting, LinkedIn, and more!
  • Being a Connected and Digital Scholar
    • Digital research impact and influence, ORCID iD, academic social networks designed for scholars, and measuring impact.
  • Openness in Academia: Benefits & Challenges
    • Being open in higher education, the tension between challenges and affordances of online, and experiences from networked scholars.
  • Building Your Social and Digital Presence Online
    • Creating your own space and place for scholarship (at least 3 platforms)
  • Developing Your Digital Academic Identity
    • Bonus: ways to aggregate and showcase your digital/social profiles

In the  #AcDigID workshop, we will share ideas for online identity development, discuss open and shared practices on social media, and dig into the challenges and affordance of  networked participatory scholarship (Veletsianos & Kimmons, 2012).  I learned a great deal in the last workshop held in May, and I continue to learn what it means to “be online” in higher ed. I alway welcome any and all suggestions, experiences, and stories you have for academic digital identity development. If you are or have been a higher education faculty OR staff member who is/was on social media, academic networking sites, or just online – please consider giving some advice to my #AcDigID workshop participants — here’s how YOU can contribute your #AcDigID ADVICE and KNOWLEGE for this learning experience:

  • ADD TO THE LIST: to my “Academics Who Tweet” Twitter list? I would like to get a variety of scholars from all disciplines and areas in higher education. Let me know if YOU or someone else should be added.
  • TELL YOUR #AcDigID STORY: Interested in coming to talk about your #AcDigID development? How did you become a networked scholar? Why do you participate in networked, online communities higher ed? Let me know – happy to have you join during our #AcDigID Online, Synchronous Meeting on Wednesday, September 28, 201fromrm 12-1 pm EST.
  • JOIN THE #AcDigID TWITTER CHAT: Join us for the LIVE Twitter chat on Friday, September 30 from 1-2 pm EST – We will, of course, use the #AcDigID to ask questions and discuss the issues, challenges, and affordances of being a networked scholar or higher ed professional online.
  • USE the #AcDigID HASHTAG this week to introduce yourself, say hello, share resources, or offer advice.

Reference:

Veletsianos, G. & Kimmons, R. (2012). Networked Participatory Scholarship: Emergent Techno-Cultural Pressures Toward Open and Digital Scholarship in Online Networks. Computers & Education, 58(2), 766-774.

The #3Wedu Podcast No. 9: Elevate and Amplify

 

Do you ever think about how to best amplify one another in higher education? Jess Knott shared about this in her #3Wedu podcast blog post that included this article about amplification tactics, which left her staff thinking more critically about the voices heard around the table. Are we guilty sweeping comments from ladies aside in meetings? How do we amplify messages of our female peers in higher ed? How do you elevate other women in the field? Let’s share this message loud and proud. It’s time to turn the conversation about amplifying women in higher ed up to 11.

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Image c/o Flickr user Kainet

Join the #3Wedu posse as we share strategies and stories for elevating our voice. Share your story and tweet with during episode no. 9.: Amplify & Elevate. Tune into YouTube LIVE  TODAY: Wednesday, September 21st  at 3 PM PT//6 pm CT // 6 PM ET

Watch the podcast here on the NEW YouTube LIVE feature (p.s. Google+ ON AIR Hangouts were killed on September 12th. R.I.P. G+ hangouts!]:

#NetworkedCoP: Networked Communities of Practice [RESEARCH STUDY]

The Networked Communities of Practice (#NetworkedCoP) study is created to explore how student affairs and higher education professionals participate in online networked communities. We would like to learn HOW and WHY graduate students, professional staff, senior administrators, and scholar-practitioners in higher ed are engaged with blogging, Facebook group discussion, Twitter chats, creating podcasts, using hashtags and more.

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We see higher education staff using social media to not only network, but also support one another, provide learning opportunities, share knowledge, and contribute back to the field.


 Please consider participating in our study to share with more about your digital practices:

  • What communities you participate and interact with online?
  • Why do you contribute or interact with these networked communities?
  • How does your digital practice impact your professional identity and influence?
  • What type of professional development, networking, and learning have you experienced from these communities?
  • What benefits, challenges, and affordances occur within this networked practice?

To learn more about our study and participate by telling us about your networked community involvement [SURVEY] or more share more about your networked self [INTERVIEW], please visit our research website:

https://networkedcommunityofpractice.wordpress.com/

This research project is being conducted by Dr. Paul Eaton (Sam Houston State University) and Dr. Laura Pasquini (University of North Texas) and has been approved by the SHSU Institutional Review Board (#30423) and the UNT Institutional Review Board (#16-310).

Academic Support In A Digital Age

Although you might not advise  or support students in an online degree program, there are increasing efforts for teaching and learning technology.  Learning delivery and design does impact how we support our students. Adoption of technology, either a tool, platform, or space, will also be driven by decisions to change pedagogical methods (Bates, 2015), and this includes the current advising model/culture on campus. Our students want the same flexibility, access, and online support. Often is is just the degree program and curriculum that appears online, then the digital student success side of the program is an afterthought for these technology determinations. We need to have more student success and academic advising programs consider the best technology to provide advising content and service delivery (Steele, 2015) for a more learner-centered approach.

digital DNA

Digital DNA by Adriana Varella and Nilton Malz 

Whether you are leveraging technology to optimize your student support services or your campus is transitioning to either a blended or online learning model, there is both a need and desire to improve technology for academic advisors and student support practices in higher education (Pasquini & Steele, 2015). During your planning, it will be critical for your institution to ask the following questions before selecting technology-mediated environments for advising and learner support: 

  • What technologies is your institution currently utilizing for academic advising or student support?
  • How does your division or unit on campus decide on the most appropriate mode of technology delivery? [Will this be a campus-wide decision?]
  • What factors should be determined when designing technology in advising program and/or student support functional area?
  • What other strategies and structural support might benefit your campus in preparing  staff as they support learners digitally?  (e.g. training, skill development, etc.)

Join me as I discuss this further next Wednesday, September 14th from 12-1 pm EDT for the ACPA Commission for Academic Support in Higher Education (CASHE) Presents Webinar: “Selecting Technology for Advising and Supporting Your Students.” During this online event, I will be sharing a few evidence-based ideas and practical resources to help your advising team address these questions. This webinar will introduce your campus planning group to a few strategies and structures as they select technology for advising and student support. Sign up for this FREE webinar sponsored by ACPA CASHE here: http://goo.gl/tR8THa 

References

Bates, A. W., (2015). Chapter 9: Modes of delivery. In Guidelines for designing teaching and learning for a digital age. Open Text BC.

Pasquini, L. A., & Steele, G. (2016). Technology in academic advising: Perceptions and practices in higher education. figshare. Retrieved from https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.3053569.v7

Steele, G. (2015). Using Technology for Intentional Student Evaluation and Program AssessmentNACADA Clearinghouse of Academic Advising Resources. 

The #3Wedu Podcast No. 8: Happy #HigherEd New Year!

Today is the last day of August. With this and labor day weekend just ahead, it really feels like the end of summer. Now it’s back to school time! I would say summer flew by — but really, that would be a lie. I think I made the most of the summer to work on research projects, write a manuscript or two with the fantastic #AcWriSummer group, teach a couple of classes online, visualize publications, and stoke the fire for grant & research ahead! Of course, I took a break to enjoy lake life, hiking, and road trips (See #GirlsGoneEast on Instagram).

In higher education, I have always viewed each semester as a “fresh start” in our academic cycle. With the fall semester here, this term, in particular, brings about new beginnings for many students, staff, and faculty on campus. In the first week of our academic semester, I enjoy reading about my students’ hopes, dreams, and aspirations they share on my student information forms. It often makes me sit back and think about what I want to get out of the course or work ahead in the term as well.

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Image by cocoparisienne  available under under Creative Commons license.

Hopes. Dreams. Aspirations. This is our topic for The #3Wedu Podcast, as shared by Nori on The #3Wedu Blog. Join us TODAY (8/31) as we reflect on previous milestones, thank our mentors, and recap past learning experiences. Then share with us what YOU want to do in the new school year, as we ponder our own #highered new year goals.

Grab your favorite grape soda, and raise your glass for The #3Wedu Podcast: Episode No.8 today, Wednesday, August 31st, 2016 at 3 pm PST // 5 pm CDT // 6pm EST:

My Lessons Learned from #AcWriSummer 2016

Earlier this summer, I proposed to form a “writing posse” that would encourage support and accountability…and keep my own writing progress in check. Little did I know how important this would be! I am SO very grateful for my scholarly peers who accepted this team challenge, lCatherineCaroline & Patrice. These colleagues were also invested in working on a specific writing project, and they were all willing to join me on this 8-week experiment we’ve called #AcWriSummer 2016.

acwrisummer16

We started using chapters of the book, Writing Your Journal Article in 12 Weeks, to guide our writing process; however, we ended up branching out to figure out what we could accomplish or support over the summer.  I sincerely thank these ladies for their willingness to contribute in our online weekly meetings, tweets for motivation/support, and general advice for editing of manuscripts and resources to develop our academic writing practice.

Here’s what I have learned from #AcWriSummer 2016:

  • Accountability for academic writing is good thing – regular, structured check-ins or checkpoints for the writing process as you draft a manuscript
  • Apparently, holidays take away from my writing habit (I stopped tracking my writing time/progress after Canada Day)
  • Creating a habit of writing is key – always schedule writing chunks early & often on your calendar (block out time)!
  • Laying the foundation of a manuscript helps your writing — outline your paper structure 
  • Focusing and targeting your manuscript for the publication outlet you want is critical! Wr
  • Drafting a solid abstract that will get read and cited — keep in mind this might be all other scholars read and use, so be explicit about your study & findings here
  • Research the empirical literature WELL!  (see resources below or read my #AcWriSummer Week 3 post)
  • What I write is not always what others read — be clear in your arguments and findings
  • Attack & conquer editing with peers to tighten drafts – Google docs are great for a 1st review of a draft
  • Consider what your writing process is and if it needs to be changed (or is it working)
  • Ask a colleague/peer for help if and when you get stuck on something in your writing
  • Solicit for ideas for elements of how to improve and enhance your manuscript from an outside perspective
  • Helpful reads and tips for writing
  • Collaborative team attacks for editing sections of a manuscript
  • Reminders incremental academic writing is still progress
  • Social experience with both peer learning and care – academic writing does not have to be a solo endeavor
  • Sharing of resources, reads, and tips to support writing (see below); however, you really need to figure out what will work best for YOU in your academic writing practice.

Interested in supporting your own #acwri practice? Here are a few great resources our #AcWriSummer group curated during the last couple of months:

Now that our “formal” #AcWriSummer 2016 curriculum is over, it is time to get these drafts finished.  I will need some #ShutUpAndWrite time before I can properly enjoy any holiday time that remains in August. At least I have my motivation for getting my #acrwisummer projects done. Happy writing, y’all!

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Image c/o PhD Comics

The #3Wedu Podcast No.7: Job Start Up in Higher Ed

TODAY, Wednesday, July 13th at 3 pm PST//5 pm CST//6 PM EST the #3Wedu Podcasters will discuss issues around getting started and establishing yourself in a new position in higher ed. In previous #3Wedu podcast episodes, we’ve discussed issues that a number of women face as they move throughout their career, including (but not limited to): the double bind, importance of supporting one another, mentoring, the value of care work, and removing organizational barriers for women. This next podcast we dig into the following questions, not in any particular order:

  • What are the things you should do just before and after you start a new job? This may include salary negotiations, benefits, culture and fit.
  • How should you plan your professional development funding? Suggestions and ideas for opportunities for learning and growth in your career.
  • Do you agree with this study or think we have to be “warm” to advance in your career?: To Seem Confident Women Have to be Seen as Warm 
  • We were thrilled to have Mary Niemiec as our special guest for our “Wine Box” rant, rave & review.

Flickr photo c/o lamenta3

Join us TONIGHT with the following show notes http://bit.ly/3wedu7  and by tuning into the LIVE broadcast here:

This blog post is cross-posted at EdTechIsGorgeous and The #3Wedu Podcast blog.