Presence & Visibility With Scholarship #scholar14

Are you “present” online? Do you share your scholarship? Are you blogging about your research in the field? Can I find a slide deck of your last academic presentation on SlideShare? Have you tweeted about your academic writing lately (#acwri)?

Based on last week’s conversation in The Networked Scholars (#scholar14) MOOC – you probably should. Week 1 focused on Visibility, Presence & Branding – Check out the LIVE chat video and tweets. During the live chat discussion, Laura Czerniewicz reminded us that:

The challenge with online “presence” is that scholarship and research distribution is not shared equally – or at least not well represented online (based on the Web of Science documents):

This image and article left me with a number of questions for visibility and presence for scholars:

  • Why is the representation of scholarship skewed geographically?
  • What impact does this geographic distribution of knowledge have on our research disciplines?
  • How can we work to have more “market share” of knowledge in underrepresented areas of the globe?
  • Do the location of networking sharing services impact the voice of disciplines? Can this be neutralized/balanced?

Although the web has the potential to create a level playing field for scholarship participation, there still seems to be infrastructures and institutions in academia that prevent researchers from uploading content and sharing knowledge across geographic boundaries.

With the growth of digital scholarship and online knowledge sharing, it is critical that scholars engage in distribution of their research impact to their field. Through research identity management and citation tracking, scholars are able to specifically identify influence, share findings, access publications, and connect with academic peers for collaboration and further scholarly work:

Academics should utilize these emerging platforms to increase their influence and reach beyond traditional publishing forums. These researcher identification and citation tools are not “just for geeks,” but rather a growing expectation for scholarship development and publication notation. It is a critical time to rethink how research is produced, distributed, and acknowledged. Researcher impact tools, such as ORCID, Researcher ID, Scopus, and Google Scholar Citations, will help to identify citation influence and impact of knowledge for the field with respect to publication use. Social academic tools, such as Academia.edu and Mendeley, provide scholars a place to share their professional profile, links to research, and areas of research interest (Pasquini, Wakefield, Reed, & Allen, 2014).

It is important to consider where you will share your progress, publications, and work for your discipline. It also helps to organize your scholarly citations and publications. Where will you leave your digital scholarly footprint? How will you track your research impact? What do you want to be found online about your research?

Reference:

Pasquini, L. A., Wakefield, J. S., Reed, A., & Allen, J. M. (2014). Digital scholarship and impact factors: Methods and tools to connect your research. Proceedings of the 2014 AACE World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (ELEARN) in New Orleans, LA.

Do You Want to Learn About Learning Analytics? #dalmooc

Last week, I attended the UTA LINK Lab talk presented by Dragan Gasevic (@dgasevic) on learning analytics and research. This discussion shared all the digital traces and learning that can be collected and measured in our various learning environments, and questions how we are best doing some of these analytics within our institutions. Although we have a number of statistics, data, and information on our learners – how can we offer actionable insight, summative feedback, and information about learner progress. Our post-secondary institutions seem to want to only deal with the “R” word = Retention. Often institutions are looking to identify students at risk, provide information about learning success, and understand how to enhance learning – but how can we effectively use data when often times our metrics only focus on single outcomes?

data-analytics-608x211

Photo c/o the #dalmooc edX Course Site

Instead, it is the process and context that our education institutions need to identify when looking at learning analytics, that is, the need to understand and optimize learning (Butler & Winne, 1995). Whether we apply the community of inquiry framework,  cognitive presence, which includes triggering events, exploration, integration and resolution (Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2001), or the COPES (Conditions, Operations, Products, Evaluation, & Standards) model (Winnie, 1997) –  it is the meaningful data points for learning analytics that really need to be identified within our educational institutions.  As @dgasevic said, “Learning analytics is about LEARNING!” Often we assume the data collected from our courses and our systems will provide us with the answers; however if not identified in a purposeful way – why bother? What we really need to consider is, what does it mean to study and support the learning experience and not just the end results?

Here are a few areas of learning analytics and data evaluation need to be considered (just to name a few):

  • learner agency and self-regulation
  • interaction effect – external and internal conditions
  • formal and informal learning communities
  • instructional intervention methods
  • multimodal learning
  • emerging technology impact, i.e. mobile, wearable tech, etc.

Here are  questions our institutions need to consider when they want examine learning analytics:

  • What data we are collecting? And why?
  • How does the learner information we know contribute to the PROCESS of learning?
  • Who should be part of this learning analytic research for learning?
  • How can we best present and interact with the data? Can this be more immediate?
  • How can we encourage and support multidisciplinary teams to study learning analytics at our institutions?
  • Are we being being driven by questions of need, access, and availability for the learning data collection?
  • What ethical and privacy considerations should be considered when collecting data around learning?

Interested in learning more about learning analytics and data in education? Check out the paper in press by Gasevic, Dawson, and Siemens http://bit.ly/techtrends15  or better yet – join the 9-week Data Analytics & Learning MOOC that UTA & edX is hosting on this very topic starting Monday, October 20th: http://linkresearchlab.org/dalmooc/ or follow along with the conversation on Twitter #dalmooc.

References

Butler, D. L., & Winne, P. H. (1995). Feedback and self-regulated learning: A theoretical synthesis. Review of educational research, 65(3), 245-281.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2001). Critical thinking, cognitive presence, and computer conferencing in distance education. American Journal of Distance Education, 15(1), 7-23.

Gasevic, Dawson, Siemens (inpress). Let’s not forget: Learning analytics are about learning. TechTrends. http://bit.ly/techtrends15

Winne, P. H. (1997). Experimenting to bootstrap self-regulated learning. Journal of educational Psychology, 89(3), 397.

Thriving… Not Just Surviving in Your Ph.D.

Today is the start of the UNT Learning Technologies (#untLT) Doctoral Fall Writing Boot Camp (October 17-18, 2014). This program has been developed by our department to support our doctoral researchers in their dissertation progress. Currently a number of doctoral researchers are writing and working in the LT Agora with snacks, support, and relevant available resources.

DocStudents

I am looking forward to joining the “Doctoral Campaign Strategy Meeting” tonight on a panel this evening with our faculty, including Drs. Cox, Ennis-Cole, Knezek, Tyler-Wood, and J. Wircenski. (Drs. Allen and Warren will participate remotely if they are able). This Q & A session will provide some advice and give some ideas for not only how to “survive” but also thrive in doctoral research regardless of the phase.

This presentation is a remix of @drjeffallen ‘s wisdom/advice

I like to use the phrase thrive not survive, to for the doctoral process. There are a number  a number of supportive strategies and ideas to get to the PhD finish line, including:

  • Making a habit of WRITING & scheduling only #ShutUpAndWrite session
  • Social, emotional & mental support
  • Identifying champions in your department, on campus & in your discipline
  • Outlining the major professor-advisee working relationship – needs & expectations
  • Using the advice of your committee wisely
  • Organizing your research materials & literature review effectively
  • Mapping out your data collection process
  • Attending to your personal-wellness & well-being
  • Connecting to a cohort of scholars in your personal learning network
  • Giving up something, to get something to finish your dissertation
  • Understanding how you work best
  • Consulting & using the resources available
  • Focusing your efforts wisely

Want to learn more? I will be sure to post notes and advice from our panel of professors and doctoral researchers who attend. What is YOUR advice on how to THRIVE in a doctoral program and through the dissertation process? Please share!

UPDATE (post-panel):

Doctoral Strategy Panel - Group Photo

From left to right: Drs. Cox, Ennis-Cole, Knezek, Pasquini, Tyler-Wood, and Wircenski.

Once A Networked Scholar… Always One? #scholar14

 

Social media is my thing (so I’ve heard). Really, the THING about social media is the SOCIAL. Throughout my personal, professional and academic career, I have touted the value of my personal learning network on Twitter. I give credit to this 140-character medium as it daily contributes to my literature review, data collection, and connected engage in my discipline.

I am not alone in the love of Twitter and scholarship. Other academics have identified value in Twitters’s role for scientific publication and power of dissemination when shared among the network of scholars. In contrast, there is a dark side to being in this particular space (“they” say). I shared this article earlier in the stream today, “To tweet or not to tweet: academic freedom and social media” – if you have not read it,  you should. This article is one of MANY that calls into question the use and impact of social media networks in academia. As an early career researcher, I am interested in learning more about the impacts to the field and the influence digital scholarship has for teaching, learning, service and research scholarship. {More on this research and work… to come.}

csfzzj3z-1412558503

 

I have a number of questions that need answers on the networked/digital scholar topic:

  • How will social networks shape tenure and promotion?
  • What are the issues academics face when being active in social media spaces?
  • What challenges will emerge with the use of transmedia for research and learning in post-secondary education?
  • Will digital scholarship impact and shift how tenure and promotion?
  • What other influences should be considered for impact factors and scholarly contributions?
  • How does the digital influence our own doctoral programs & preparation?
  • Does digital influence truly impact impact factors for research? Should it?
  • What information do we know about “the networked scholar”?

These are just a few of my questions. I have more. I signed up for George’s (@veletsianos) Networked Scholar (#scholar14) MOOC to continue this dialogue and bat around a few ideas with other interested scholars. I am looking forward to continuing my meanderings on my blog and, of course, on the Twitters => #scholar14 Won’t you join in the discussion and banter as well? http://networkedscholars.net/

The 2015 #et4online Call for Presentations is now OPEN!

 

#et4online banner

Dear Colleagues,

The 8th Annual Emerging Technologies for Online Learning International Symposium (#et4online) provides myriad opportunities for you to share your knowledge and expertise in online teaching and learning. Our program includes pre-conference workshops, electronic posters, information sessions, and featured sessions along with extraordinary plenary speakers.

Share and learn about the innovative and emerging practices to enhance your research, student support, teaching, and learning at your institution. The call for proposals is open as of TODAY – October 1, 2014 until December 1, 2014.

Track Description
Organization, Leadership and Challenges for Innovation Proposals submitted to this track should relate directly to the role of institutional leadership for the strategic implementation of innovative online learning to reach institutional goals. Suggestions for this track include:

A. Leadership & Values: Innovation in management & timetables, monitoring quality, new trends & services, social entrepreneurship, social inclusion & equity

B. Agile Approaches to Change: For institutional-level online learning benefits, models, effective practices, and challenges from policy or governance

C. Solutions to Challenges: Digital fluency of faculty, rewards for teaching, competition from new models of education, scaling teaching innovations & expanding access, and relevant education models

Learning Environments and Frameworks Proposals submitted to this track should focus on effective and/or innovative course/program models and design(s), with an emphasis on research-based best practices, effectiveness, efficiencies, and scalability. Suggestions for this track include:

A. Infrastructure for learning environments: Information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure, physical space, learning space, and platforms for education online

B. Development of learning space: Integration of online, hybrid, and collaborative learning, training and development required, or evolution to online learning

C. Research models: methods and evaluation of curriculum outcomes, design or development for learning environments and frameworks

Open and Collaborative Education Proposals submitted to this track should promote the production and use of open pedagogies and collaborative models for teaching and learning. This might include strategies and suggested practices for the following areas:

A: Content & Curricula: Development of Open Education Resources (OER) including open online courses both private and massive, cross and trans-disciplinary curricula, competency-based curricula, and student-developed content

B. Connectedness: Networking with real-world experts or professionals in the field, social networks, online learning communities and communities of practice, and learning events

C. Cooperation & group engagement: Growing ubiquity and use of social media, transmedia, socially constructed learning, gamification and badges for learning

Evidence-based Learning and Assessment Proposals submitted to this track should relate to learning analytics, institutional data, big data as related to, program outcomes, educational effectiveness, and enhancing the student learning experience. This track may include evaluation of student, staff or faculty course/program assessment. A focus on research is strongly encouraged and should include research design, methodology, results and applications to policy, practice and/or theory.

Suggestions for this track include:

A. Assessment: implementation of assessment plan, evaluation formats, formative/summative assessment, informal/non-formal learning for curriculum review

B. Research: Data collection and analysis methodologies, conceptual models, interventions and innovative approaches

C. Evaluation: Designing for learning analytics, and applications of big data

Effective Teaching and Learning Pedagogy Proposals submitted to this track should address the many facets online teaching and learning with an emphasis on pedagogical practice. Proposals should provide innovative approaches and methods for digital pedagogy and curriculum development. Suggestions for this track include:

A. Learning Practices: Producing authentic learning artifacts, exploration, creativity, and play. Peer-to-peer, self-regulated connected, interest-based, self-directed, and game-based learning

B. Teaching Practices: fostering social presence, balancing structure with student autonomy, designing multimodal learning experiences, and repurposing digital tools for learning

C. Supporting Faculty: instructional design approaches, faculty development programs and models, curriculum development resources, expediting the diffusion of innovative practices, and incentives for pedagogical innovation

Technology Test Kitchen Proposals for this track are unique from other program tracks at #et4online this year. The expectation for “test kitchen” is to create a space at the conference for hands-on, focused and practical applications of emerging learning technologies. The Test Kitchen station will feature expert “chefs” who will guide attendees, showcasing applications and tools for innovative, digital education. If your proposal is accepted, you will demo at least three (3) tools (15-20 minute demonstrations). Your proposal can include links to websites, videos (less than 2 minutes), or examples and a description of what you hope to accomplish in these mini-lessons.

The Technology Test Kitchen space will be similar to a learning lab, where conference participants will take advantage of the “bring your own device” (BYOD) format. If your proposal is selected, you will share a “Technology Test Kitchen Recipe” and demonstration. The recipe is a targeted “how to” guide for participants to learn and explore technology applications and ideas for learning. Suggested areas and applications may include:

A. Learning Technology Demonstration: General suggestions include audio, video, social media, collaboration, communication, presentation, 3D printing, and mobile apps.

B. Instructional Design Strategy & Implementation: Suggestions for this include the application of flipped learning, learning analytics, games and gamification, quantified self, augmented reality, and visualizations.

On behalf of the @OLCToday and the @MERLOTorg,  we look forward to reading your presentation submissions, and seeing you in Dallas for #et4online!

Laura Pasquini Jane Moore
Laura Pasquini, OLC Program Chair Jane Moore, MERLOT Program Chair
@laurapasquini
@janepmoore

P.s. Have you heard about the great keynote and plenary speakers we have lined up? I am looking forward to learning from @mizuko@bonstewart@GardnerCampbell and YOU!

LookWhosSpeakingET4Online

The State of Social Media @ #edu14

State of #SocialMedia in Higher Ed (2)

Looks like EDUCAUSE 2014 (#edu14) is just around the corner.

I am heading out to Orlando on Sunday and will be sharing my dissertations research at the #edu14 Virtual Seminar with Tanya Joosten (@tjoosten) on Monday, September 29, 2014. Interested in learning more about it? Sign up (HERE) for the online, half-day seminar to help with your social media planning:

Seminar 2A – The State of Social Media Guidance: Implications of Guidelines, Policies, and Practice in Higher Education (separate registration required)

Higher education institutions are using social media to communicate and engage their campus community; however, very few are examining the impact and implications of social media guidance. From research to practical applications, this seminar will detail the current state of social media guidance in postsecondary education and identify key elements of guiding principles that offer suggestions for student support, teaching, training and development, research, infrastructure, and more.

OUTCOMES
Participants will be able to:

  1. Articulate current higher education social media guidelines and policy document trends, categories, themes, and patterns emerging from research
  2. Identify practical components for effective social media guidelines for campuses
  3. Create meaningful guidelines and policies to positively impact teaching, learning, research, and development at your institution

Since I am only at #edu14 for a short stint,  I plan on making the most of my time. Here is my quick hit list of sessions that are in line with my research agenda:

If I was staying longer at #edu14, I would most likely attend these sessions:

Will you be at EDUCAUSE 2014? What is your focus and objective for attending this year? More importantly, will we be able to have a bit of a chat around these issues. I hope so. See you @ #edu14!

Have Conferences, Will Travel – Fall 2014 Edition

With the start of the academic semester comes a series of conferences. I’m grateful for the conference survival guides and other helpful conference hacks shared by my PLN. Due to limited travel funds and time, I had to decline a few conferences; however I will be sure to follow along the Twitter backchannel (I am looking at you #HEWeb14 and #SMSociety14).

In considering the cost of professional development at many conferences, I have learned to get more involved to help fund this sort of travel.

jure

Image c/o @jure

Here are a few ways to get involved and learn how to fund your own conference travel with your professional affiliations:

  • Volunteer at the conference – check-in desk, hospitality, and more! Ask to volunteer!
  • Apply to present a Pre-Conference workshop – often you are eligible for comped registration and/or bonus honorarium to travel.
  • Get involved with conference planning – join the conference steering committee or planning group. It gets you networked and often offers a discount for registration and/or accommodations
  • Get invited – See if invites are available for featured talks, workshops or edu sessions. Tap into your network and share what you are working on.
  • Stay with a friend - I have housed and been housed at a number of conference locations just to avoid the steep hotel costs. Bunk up, or find a local off the conference beat.
  • Apply for a travel grant – This might be at your own institution, through the professional organization, or other entity.
  • See what’s local – You will be surprised to learn a number of different conferences, workshops, and other P.D. that is happening in your own neck of the woods OR online. :)
  • Present virtually! – Limited travel? See if the conference offers virtual papers, workshops or posters and submit your CFP! If you’re in the #edtech realm, you will likely find this a popular option to travel.

Here is my quick conference list for the Fall 2014 term:

Where are you traveling this academic term? Will our conference travel cross paths? How have you creatively spread your travel funds? Please share. :)